Northern Shuswap Tribal Council

In the News

** MEDIA RELEASE **June 1, 2017 – NStQ React to BC Election Results and Formation of Government

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PRESS RELEASE_NStQ Leadership Reacts to BC Election Results_2017-06-01


** NOTICE OF CORRECTION ** May 8th, 2017 – Incorrect information within article on page 5 of May/June Edition of The Lexey’em

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NOTICE OF CORRECTION_Lexeyem MayJune2017docx


** FIRST NATIONS and the PROVINCIAL ELECTION ** – April 26, 2017 – Let’s Make Sure First Nations Play a Major Role in Determining the next BC Government

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First Nations_BC Provincial Election-2017-04-21


** MEDIA RELEASE ** April 24, 2017 – NStQ Leadership meets with Premier Clark at WLIB’s Chief James Louie Building.

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WLIB PRESS RELEASE – Leadership meets with Premier Clark – 24-APR-2017


** MEDIA RELEASE ** April 21, 2017 – Soda Creek First Nation Deeply Impacted by Recent Tragedy

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PRESS RELEASE_Soda Creek First Nation Deeply Impacted by Recent Tragedy_2017-04-21


** STATUS CARD NOTICE – CLARIFICATION_April5-2017 **

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IR NOTICE APPT BASIS 4 APR 2017


 

** INDIAN REGISTRY OFFICE – STATUS CARD UPDATE **April 4, 2017

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IR Notice. Status Card Days. 4 Apr 2017

 


** MEDIA RELEASE **March 24/2017 – NStQ Leadership Supports Expansion plans of Cariboo Memorial Hospital

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PRESS RELEASE_NStQ Support Cariboo Mem Hospital Expansion Plans – 2017-03-24_final

 


Indian Registry Office Notice    –    STATUS CARDS

The Northern Shuswap Tribal Council Indian Registry Office will issue Status Cards on an APPOINTMENT – BASIS on Fridays Only starting on: Friday, January 6, 2017.
Appointments will occur in 20 minute increments:

Starting at 8:40 AM with the last appointment at 3:50 PM

• There will be No Appointments between 12:00 PM and 1:00 PM

  • Band and Affiliates Rate (Williams Lake, Soda Creek and Stswēceḿc/Xgāťtem) =  No Charge
  • Canim Lake  = $ 5.00
  • All Other Bands and Affiliates = $ 25.00

We accept Cash Only – no debit or credit cards.
2 Pieces of identification are required before a Status Card can be issued.

Telephone inquiries and requests for documentation are welcome Monday to Friday from 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM.  Contact either:

Marion Chelsea @ 250-392-7361 ext. 208

Dave Feil @ 250-392-7361 ext. 209


*MEDIA RELEASE*

Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde Welcomes Supreme Court of Canada Decision to Hear Williams Lake Indian Band Specific Claims Case

by ahnationtalk on October 17, 2016

(Ottawa, ON): Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Perry Bellegarde said last Thursday’s decision by the Supreme Court of Canada to hear the Williams Lake Indian Band appeal is an important step in the struggle for justice on land rights and rights recognition for all First Nations.

The Williams Lake Indian Band is appealing a decision by the Federal Court of Appeal that overturned a decision of the Specific Claims Tribunal acknowledging the wrongful dispossession of the Band’s village lands prior to Confederation.

“The Williams Lake Indian Band has our full support as we look toward a Supreme Court of Canada decision that will uphold First Nations’ rights and the Specific Claims Tribunal’s legitimacy,” said AFN National Chief Bellegarde. “This is essential to upholding justice and inherent rights for the Williams Lake Indian Band and all First Nations seeking justice before the Tribunal.” The National Chief noted that a negative ruling would undermine the ongoing work of reconciliation.

The Williams Lake Indian Band filed a specific claim against the Crown with the Specific Claims Tribunal in 2011, under the federal Specific Claims Tribunal Act. In 2014, the Tribunal ruled in a final and binding decision that the Williams Lake Indian Band had established a valid claim against the Crown. In response, the Crown sought a judicial review of this case, and on February 29, 2016, the Federal Court of Appeal took an extraordinary step by dismissing the Tribunal’s ruling and substituting its own while rejecting the longstanding claim made by the Williams Lake Indian Band.

A link to the Williams Lake Case Summary can be found at: http://www.scc-csc.ca/case-dossier/info/sum-som-eng.aspx?cas=36983

The Assembly of First Nations is the national organization representing First Nation citizens in Canada. Follow AFN on Twitter @AFN_Updates.

―30―

For more information please contact:

Alain Garon, AFN Bilingual Communications Officer
613-241-6789 ext. 382
613-292-0857 (cell)
agaron@afn.ca

Jenn Jefferys, AFN Communications Officer
613-241-6789 ext. 110
613-222-9656 (cell)
jjefferys@afn.ca


*MEDIA RELEASE*

Northern Shuswap Treaty Society Board of Directors Announce new Treaty Chief Negotiator

August 25th, 2016 (Williams Lake, British Columbia)

The Northern Shuswap Treaty Society (NSTS) Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Robert (Bob) Moreas has been selected to fill the position of Northern Secwepemc te Qelmucw (NStQ) Treaty Negotiator.

Mr. Moreas, who was selected after a thorough screening process, will officially begin his duties as the Treaty Negotiator on September 6th, 2016, and will help the NStQ move forward into Stage 5 Final Agreement Negotiations of the six-stage made-in-BC treaty process. His office will be situated in the Northern Shuswap Tribal Council building in Williams Lake on a full time basis.

“Bob joins the NStQ from his home community of Lax Kw’alaams (Lac-wa-lams) and we are very excited to add him to our team. He brings with him six years of experience in negotiations as well as a passion for Aboriginal Rights”, says Donna Dixon, NSTS Board of Directors Chairperson. She continues, “We believe that Bob’s experience and skills will enhance the effectiveness of an already strong treaty team.”

Following his orientation, Mr. Moreas will take the lead role at the negotiation table with the support and experience of the entire NStQ Treaty Team.

For Media Inquiries please contact:

Brad McGuire, Communications Coordinator

P: 250-392-7361     E: b.mcguire@nstq.org

The Northern Shuswap Tribal Council (NSTC) is a non-governing body which supports and works on behalf of the four Northern Secwepemc te Qelmucw (NStQ) member communities of Williams Lake Indian Band (T’exelc), Soda Creek Indian Band (Xats’ull), Canim Lake Indian Band (Tsq’escen’) and Stswecem’c Xgat’tem (Canoe Creek / Dog Creek First Nations). The Northern Shuswap Treaty Society is the treaty specific entity of the Northern Shuswap Tribal Council.


IMPORTANT FISHERIES NOTICE! – August 22, 2016

This is one of the most difficult seasons to be fishing and trying to manage for the NStQ Fisheries to try and achieve food fish requirements for the winter due to the low abundances of sockeye in the Fraser.  Run sizes are so low that escapement (spawning) will be lowest on record for this cycle. Early estimates for the Quesnel Summer Sockeye were to be around 15,000. Actual numbers are around 5,337, about a third of the original estimate. This is the lowest return in over a hundred years, since catch data has been recorded.
With that being said the Northern Shuswap te Qelmucw fisheries remain open for chinook and there are still concerns for the sockeye runs. However, we realize that there will be some sockeye caught during the chinook fisheries, and that these fish will be retained by the NStQ for Food, Social and Ceremonial purposes. We ask that Northern Secwepemc fishers remain conservative in their catch of sockeye and retain only what they require. We strongly suggest that you do not fish at all.
Non-NStQ fishers are not permitted to fish in the NStQ area for the remainder of 2016, due to the fact that there is not enough fish available to meet the NStQ Food requirements.
The terms of the NStQ Fisheries are subject to change depending on the information updates that we are provided with on Marine Test Fisheries as well as other areas.
The Northern Shuswap Tribal Council Fisheries Department wishes to thank you for your support in managing the fisheries for the future and if you have any questions feel free to contact me by phone:
Andrew Meshue   P: 250.392.7361
NSTC Fisheries Resource Manager

 


 

For information on Mount Polley Mine Tailings Pond Breach please visit our new pageMine Information

WILLIAMS LAKE TRIBUNE Story – Mt. Polley Mine Two Years Later

by Monica Lamb-Yorski – Williams Lake Tribune

Two years after the Mount Polley Mine breach, Williams Lake Indian Band Chief Ann Louie said the disaster was a wake-up call.

“It was a sad situation that caused a lot of damage to the area, but it woke the government up to realize there needs to be tougher legislation around all mining activity, not just Mount Polley,” Louie said.

In the early hours of B.C. Day holiday Monday, Aug. 4, 2014, the northern flank of the mine’s tailings impoundment failed.  During the subsequent hours about 17 million cubic metres of water and  eight million cubic metres of tailings and mine waste spilled into nearby Polley Lake, Hazeltine Creek and Quesnel Lake.

Two years later the mine is running full time, the repaired tailings impoundment is in use and 333 people are back at work at the mine. At the end of June 2016, the Mount Polley Mine Corp. submitted a draft technical report in advance of submitting a long-term water management plan and later this summer or fall it is anticipated the plan will be available for public comment.

Chief Louie said she and Xat’sull Chief Donna Dixon sit at the table with the provincial government and have been pushing for the mine code review that was tabled earlier in July by the Ministry of Energy and Mines.“We have our technical team that works with the mine and government,” Louie said. “When they apply for permits we are always in the background pushing to get the best out of them before a permit is issued.” After the breach, Louie and former Xat’sull Chief Bev Sellars signed a letter of understanding with the government that has given them a foot in the door. The technical team has also been insisting on the best outcome for the long-term water management plan. “It was something we pushed for even before the breach,” Louie said. “We still will expect the mine to do the best that it can. They have to be accountable for their actions.”

Doug Watt is a director on the Likely Chamber of Commerce. He and his wife live on the shore of Quesnel Lake on Cedar Creek Road and their biggest concern continues to be the discharge of water from the mine site into Quesnel Lake. “There is the possibility of it still impacting the quality of the lake,” Watt said. The problem, he added, is the use of the lake water to dilute the discharged water to make it meet water quality standards. “Quesnel Lake’s water quality is such higher quality than B.C. water quality guideline standards that in actual fact that means they are continuing to pollute Quesnel Lake and are changing the quality of the water of the lake.” Watt said he and a group of concerned citizens have asked the mine for data from its instrument readings but to date the mine has not provided them with the information. The disaster has impacted ecotourism in the area, Watt added. “Friends and acquaintances I know who run businesses have seen an immediate sharp decline and disappearance. I also understand it has affected the sale of properties. People that have managed to sell have had to drop their values significantly and other people who were selling at the time, had deals disappear.”

Claudine Kadonaga and her husband Randy purchased the Likely Lodge in January 2014, opened it the May long weekend and the breach happened in August of that year. “Tourism is up this year and with the mine going we are very busy,” Kadonaga said. In the summer of 2015, 50 per cent of the tourists wanted to know how they could see the “disaster zone,” but this year so far not one person has asked — they are interested in the Gold Rush Trail and what the road is like to Barkerville or Horsefly, she said.

Likely community co-ordinator Lisa Kraus said during a community meeting on July 7, representatives covered some aspects of  the Post Event Environmental Impact Assessment Report. “Right now the lake is looking OK but one of our concerns is the greenish hue the lake is taking on that it didn’t have before the breach,” Kraus said. Another one of Kraus’s concerns is the fact there hasn’t been a report done on the social and economic impact of the breach on the local community. “People are still angry and are asking why is the water still that colour. And why are we getting heavy sediments in our water filter systems?”


NSTC MEDIA RELEASE on behalf of Soda Creek Indian Band and Williams Lake Indian Band

** FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE **

June 24, 2016

(Williams Lake, British Columbia) – The Soda Creek Indian Band (Xatśūll) and Williams lake Indian Band (T’exelc) will be issuing a statement next week regarding the recently announced approval of a full restart to the operations at Mount Polley Mine.

Work is currently being done to bring together the technical teams, leadership and community to have discussions regarding a community response and next steps.

For Media Inquiries please contact:

o Georgia Bock, Natural Resource Manager – Xatśūll First Nation
P: 250.989.2323 ext 120

OR

o Aaron Higginbottom, Natural Resource Manager – T’exelc First Nation
P: 250.296.3507 ext 113
The Northern Shuswap Tribal Council is a non-governing body which supports and works on behalf of the four Northern Secwepemc te Qelmucw member communities of Williams Lake Indian Band (T’exelc), Soda Creek Indian Band (Xats’ull), Canim Lake Indian Band (Tsq’escen’) and Stswecem’c Xgat’tem (Canoe Creek / Dog Creek First Nation).

 

WILLIAMS LAKE INDIAN BAND MEDIA RELEASE

**FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE**

June 1, 2016

Williams Lake Indian Band Community Meeting with membership respectful and productive

WILLIAMS LAKE, BC – On the evening of May 30th, following the events of last week’s illegal and aggressive occupation of the Williams Lake Indian Band Government (WLIB) Administration Office, WLIB Chief and Council met with band membership. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the circumstances surrounding the forcible office takeover, explain why Council and Elders had to take actions to end the occupation, and to address the proposal to adopt a Band Membership Meeting Procedure Bylaw.

“This was a most unfortunate incident which occurred while I was away from the community on a long-planned vacation,” states WLIB Chief Ann Louie. “I was very hurt watching the videos that were circulated on social media. Those videos clearly show how our Elders were assaulted and abused when they attempted to re-enter the WLIB Administration building. Those Elders were beaten and berated because they chose to stand up for what they believe in and to enforce the rule of law. I am so proud of our Council members and Elders who showed great strength, courage and integrity throughout the ordeal.”

The May 30th membership meeting attracted a significant turnout, and was facilitated by Dr. Ray Sanders, TRU’s Campus Director in Williams Lake. At the meeting, WLIB discussed the template “Band Membership Meeting Procedure Bylaw” proffered by the individuals orchestrating the takeover of the WLIB administration offices. The conversation at the meeting was emotional but respectful.

“I am extremely proud of our community members who showed up in large numbers to Monday evening’s meeting to support our efforts to move past this event, to heal and to build a more cohesive community,” adds Chief Louie. “It’s disturbing to me that the driving force behind the forceful siege of our administration building was the desire to see the passage of a new bylaw. The power exists under the WLIB Land Code for our community members to put together a petition that compels Council to consider a bylaw. There was absolutely no need for this incident to occur. There was no need for violence. There was no need to damage property or hurt other people. All these protestors had to do was to use the tools we created for them as part of their government structure. Democracy is always far more powerful, and more effective, than violence or tyranny.”

The draft Band Membership Meeting Procedure Bylaw will now be considered by Council and subjected to legal review. Community Elders who were directly and indirectly involved in last week’s incident are continuing to meet and debrief, with another debriefing to be held on Wednesday June 1st at the WLIB Community Centre.

A full police investigation of WLIB Administration Office takeover is ongoing.

For more information / media inquiries, please contact:
WLIB Chief, Ann Louie
P: 250-296-3507 Ext: 104
E: ann.louie@williamslakeband.ca

Weytkp!

 

**Northern Shuswap Tribal Council MEDIA RELEASE**
Northern Shuswap Tribal Council proud of Williams Lake Indian Band Elders and Council following end to tense Stand-Off

May 27th, 2016 (Williams Lake, British Columbia) – The Northern Shuswap Tribal Council (NSTC) Board of Directors are thankful that this week’s illegal and offensive three day occupation of the Williams Lake Indian Band (WLIB) administration office has come to an end.
The unfortunate incident came to a tense conclusion at approximately 4:00pm on Thursday May 26th after Williams Lake Indian Band acting chief, council and Elders forced their way back into their own administration office earlier in the afternoon following three days of occupation by the protestors.
A pushing and shoving melee ensued between the Elders, council and protesters for several minutes before the RCMP arrived to help defuse the situation and remove several of the protestors who were not Williams Lake Indian Band members. After the scuffle, the remaining protesters, WLIB council members and Elders agreed to sit down inside the building to discuss appropriate measures to resolve the dispute and to address the issues which led to the protest. It was agreed between the parties that a community meeting would be held on Monday May 30th for Williams Lake Indian Band community members, starting at 5 p.m. in WLIB’s Elizabeth Grouse Gymnasium.
The Northern Shuswap Tribal Council Board of Directors are extremely proud of how the Williams Lake Indian Band’s council and Elders dealt with this incident, remaining ethically strong with great resolve throughout the entire ordeal.
“We take great pride in the governance models and code of conduct that each of our four Northern Secwepemc te Qelmucw (NStQ) communities work within to ensure all of the programs and services, including our housing policies, are administered to support safe, healthy and lawful communities”, says NSTC Board Chair, Donna Dixon. She continues, “The Williams Lake Indian Band functions using these same values and guiding principles which we encourage the public to learn more about by visiting the WLIB website at www.WilliamsLakeBand.ca. Our policies are driven by fairness, equality and respect. As board members, we fully support and respect the lawful governance policies which Williams Lake Indian Band council follows.”
For Media Inquiries please contact:
o Donna Dixon, Northern Shuswap Tribal Council Board Chairperson P: 250-267-7464

The Northern Shuswap Tribal Council is a non-governing body which supports and works on behalf of the four Northern Secwepemc te Qelmucw member communities of Williams Lake Indian Band (T’exelc), Soda Creek Indian Band (Xats’ull), Canim Lake Indian Band (Tsq’escen’) and Stswecem’c Xgat’tem (Canoe Creek / Dog Creek First Nation).

 

 

*MEDIA RELEASE*
Northern Shuswap Tribal Council and its affiliated NStQ Treaty Group announce unofficial results of the February 11th Agreement-in-Principle Treaty Referendum
February 12th, 2016 (Williams Lake, British Columbia) The Northern Shuswap Tribal Council and its affiliated NStQ Treaty Group held an Agreement-in-Principle (AiP) referendum yesterday (February 11th). The four First Nation communities which make up the NStQ are: Canim Lake Indian Band (Tsq’escen’), Soda Creek Indian Band (Xat’sūll), Williams Lake Indian Band (T’exelc), and Canoe Creek / Dog Creek Indian Band (Stswecem’c/Xgat’tem). Community members from each of these bands voted on the following ballot question: “Do you support the recommendation of the NStQ Leadership Council to proceed to Final Agreement Negotiations?”
This is NOT a vote on the NStQ Treaty itself, a process which the NStQ has been involved in since 1994. This referendum determines whether the NStQ membership wish to continue into the final negotiations stage (Stage Five) of the six-stage made-in-BC Treaty Process. If membership votes “yes” to moving forward into Stage Five, that process can take anywhere from 3 – 5 years to complete. Then, once a ‘final agreement’ is negotiated, NStQ membership will conduct a final vote whether to accept the negotiated treaty, before its ‘Implementation’ (Stage Six) can begin. If NStQ membership votes “no” to moving forward, NStQ leadership will step back and take time to analyse the results and the process itself before determining the next course of action for the Northern Secwepemc te Qelmucw (NStQ) and its goal of achieving a future of self-determination.

”Unofficial Results” of the February 11th referendum are as follows:
Canim Lake Band (458 eligible voters): YES 125 NO 84
Soda Creek Band (336 eligible voters): YES 90 NO 48
Canoe Creek/Dog Creek Band (582 eligible voters): YES 113 NO 72

Williams Lake Band (385 eligible voters): Vote suspended at the polling station due to the disruptive illegal actions of a small group of protesters predominantly comprised of non-WLIB community members. Band Council has convened to analyze this event and have now determined that a full re-vote will take place for all eligible Williams Lake Indian Band voters on March 15th, 2016.

These referendum results are ‘unofficial’ and are currently being verified by the Referendum Officer. Once final counts are confirmed, leadership from each of the four NStQ member communities will be distributing individual media releases with statements specific to the voting results and next steps in their respective communities.

Media Inquiries regarding “Referendum Results”, please contact:
o Marg Casey
(NStQ Referendum Officer)
P: 250-392-7361 ext: 208

Media Inquiries regarding the “NStQ Treaty Process”, please contact:
o Donna Dixon
(Chairperson – Northern Shuswap Tribal Council Board of Directors)
P: 250-267-7464

17 First Avenue South
Williams Lake, BC • V2G 1H4
t 250 392 7361
f 250 392 6158

 


 

MEDIA RELEASE – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 6, 2015

Williams Lake Indian Band and Xat’sull First Nation Concerned by Mayor Walt Cobb’s Perception of Mount Polley Mine Disaster
WILLIAMS LAKE – Leaders of the Xat’sull First Nation (“XFN”) and Williams Lake Indian Band (“WLIB”) today issued a statement expressing concern over comments made by Williams Lake Mayor Walt Cobb in a recent CBC interview regarding a UBCM resolution proposing an environmental bill of rights. In particular, XFN and WLIB are dismayed by Mayor Cobb’s statements during the course of that interview that downplay the impacts of the Mount Polley Mine dam failure.

According to Mayor Cobb, the August 4, 2014 release of approximately 17 million cubic meters of water and 8 million cubic meters of tailings/materials into the Quesnel Lake watershed, an area important for salmon spawning and with great First Nations cultural value, does not constitute an environmental disaster. Mayor Cobb compared the Mount Polley event to a mudslide on the Sea-to-Sky Highway and stated, “The stuff that came out of there was water. There were no chemicals in that water.”

Water quality sampling to date has shown elevated levels of potentially harmful substances, including copper, in the receiving environment post-breach. Ongoing monitoring and assessment is being undertaken by the Mine and the Province, with input from XFN and WLIB and their team of experts, to better understand the impacts of the spill, both chemical and otherwise.

“Mayor Cobb’s comments excessively minimize the scope and gravity of the Mount Polley incident,” states WLIB Chief, Ann Louie. “This was no mere mudslide – it was a disaster that resulted in the complete evacuation of mine-related water and slurry from a tailings storage facility that was nearly four square kilometres in size. There have been relatively few incidents of this magnitude in the world, and so proper diligence must be exercised and appropriate research must be conducted before we can draw any conclusions about the possible long-term effects of the Mount Polley disaster. I would submit that Mayor Cobb’s statements are thoroughly misleading, and that they will only service to foment anger and division within our community, and in this country in general. We should not be denying the significance of this event – we should be working together, meaningfully and determinedly, to ensure it is fully understood and that best practices for remediation and restoration are implemented. ”

Both XFN and WLIB recognize the need to align resource extraction practices with more reasonable standards for environmental stewardship. “Our First Nations are not interested in stifling the economy in the Cariboo, or anywhere else,” adds XFN Chief, Donna Dixon. “We do, however, acknowledge that there are numerous shortcomings in existing environmental legislation, policy and standards. We need to renovate this framework to create a more viable and sustainable system. I don’t think that this position is unreasonable. It is a goal that we believe should be shared by all British Columbians. We only have a future, economic or otherwise, if we exercise proper stewardship of our lands and our resources.”

For more information on this media release, or the WLIB and XFN response to the Mount Polley disaster, please contact Julia Banks, XFN Natural Resources Manager, at (250) 989-2323 or Aaron Higginbottom, WLIB Natural Resources Manager, at (250) 296-3507.


 

NEWS RELEASE

October 7, 2015

UBCIC Welcomes NDP Commitment to Indigenous Communities and Rejects Conservatives’ Racist Tactics
(Coast Salish Territory/Vancouver, B.C. – October 7, 2015) The NDP released a strong commitment to Indigenous communities today, calling for a new era that embraces a Nation to Nation relationship. The NDP have 23 Indigenous candidates running in the federal election, the most Indigenous candidates of any single federal party ever.

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip, President of the Union of BC Indian Chiefs (UBCIC), stated “The NDP platform addresses the key issues of closing the education gap, strengthening Indigenous communities, addressing the housing crisis, prioritizing health care, and growing a sustainable economy- obviously they listened and carefully considered the needs of Indigenous communities. By stark contrast, the Conservatives are attempting to win public support by deliberately fomenting racial divisions within Canadian society- an insult to the Canadian public.”

Grand Chief Phillip continued, “Conservative Party member and former MP John Cummins recently rebuked women who have gone missing from Highway 16, mostly Indigenous, for engaging in ‘risky behavior.’ His abusive remarks completely ignore the well-documented impacts of economically marginalized Aboriginal communities and institutionalized racism, and are incredibly offensive.”

The NDP’s new commitments are welcomed on top of the broader, structural NDP platform that is being rolled out, which would increase the well-being of all Canadians, including Indigenous communities. This includes $100 million targeted towards clean energy development in remote communities that are dependent on diesel flown in for electricity generation, as part of a concrete action plan to address climate change. The NDP have also committed $2.7 billion over four years in affordable housing and homelessness across Canada, and committed to investing in youth suicide prevention and a national diabetes strategy, as well as food security.

“The Harper Government’s dismal record, beginning with trashing the $5.2 billion Kelowna Accord, continually and progressively cutting funding to Aboriginal communities and organizations, and a stubborn, irrational refusal to support a National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous
Women and Girls, demonstrates that the Conservative Party of Canada remains a party of aging, ignorant, and racist bigots” stated Grand Chief Stewart Phillip.

He concluded, “On behalf of my 15 grandchildren, I am looking forward to exercising my right to vote on October 19th, to get the Harper government out, and encourage everyone to do the same- let’s make real change!”

Media inquiries:
Grand Chief Stewart Phillip, Union of BC Indian Chiefs
Phone: (250) 490-5314


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AFN Federal Election Press Release: September 2, 2015

AFN_photo

Please click on image to read full article.


Journey Home Notice:  August 18, 2015

We will have updated information on the Journey Home project next week for the DSTC Students.  Please check with your education coordinators.


FISHERIES NOTICE!

File number-8600-15-26                                                           August 14, 2015

Update on the Fraser River Sockeye run.

The Fraser River Panel met this morning to receive an update from the Pacific Salmon Commission on the status of Fraser Sockeye and Pink salmon migration.

The Early Summer sockeye group in-season estimated abundance was decreased from 424,000 to 350,000 at today’s meeting (those numbers are for the total return before fishing).  Bowron, Nadina and Taseko are all in this management group (Upper Fraser fish).  The P50 pre-season forecast for this management group was 837,000.  The drop appears mainly to be attributed to Early Thompson poor return, the Early Summers returning to the Upper Fraser don’t appear to be nearly as bad in proportion, but likely still less than forecast.

The Summer Run sockeye in-season estimated abundance was decreased from the P50 pre-season forecast abundance of 4,675,000 to the P10 forecast abundance of 1,710,000.  The Upper Fraser sockeye stocks in this management group are:  Late Stuart, Stellako, Chilko and Quesnel.  Quesnel looks particularly weak according to today’s information, but all of these stocks are estimated in abundance far below forecast, including Chilko.

These reduced abundances are going to result in changes to First Nations fishing plans.  Namely, First Nations fishing plans will be decreased from the pre-season plan.  There are currently no Canadian commercial or recreational fisheries directed on sockeye. As of today August 12, 2015 the Sockeye fisheries is still open till further notice.

Further update the summer run has been downgraded again from 1.7 million to 1.15 million. For more information can visit this site www.frafs.ca. Community members may want to start fishing as there could be a possible closure notice coming within the next week or so.

Please check back regularly for updates.

For further inquiry contact Andrew Meshue NSTC Fisheries Manager or Ann Guichon NSTC Fisheries Coordinator @ 250.392.7361

Andrew Meshue

Northern Shuswap Tribal Council

17 S. 1st Avenue

Williams Lake, BC    V2G 1H4


FISHERIES NOTICE!

File number-8600-15-26
Update on the Fraser River Sockeye run.

The Fraser River Panel met this morning to receive an update from the Pacific Salmon Commission on the status of Fraser Sockeye and Pink salmon migration.

The Early Summer sockeye group in-season estimated abundance was decreased from 424,000 to 350,000 at today’s meeting (those numbers are for the total return before fishing). Bowron, Nadina and Taseko are all in this management group (Upper Fraser fish). The P50 pre-season forecast for this management group was 837,000. The drop appears mainly to be attributed to Early Thompson poor return, the Early Summers returning to the Upper Fraser don’t appear to be nearly as bad in proportion, but likely still less than forecast.

The Summer Run sockeye in-season estimated abundance was decreased from the P50 pre-season forecast abundance of 4,675,000 to the P10 forecast abundance of 1,710,000. The Upper Fraser sockeye stocks in this management group are: Late Stuart, Stellako, Chilko and Quesnel. Quesnel looks particularly weak according to today’s information, but all of these stocks are estimated in abundance far below forecast, including Chilko.

These reduced abundances are going to result in changes to First Nations fishing plans. Namely, First Nations fishing plans will be decreased from the pre-season plan. There are currently no Canadian commercial or recreational fisheries directed on sockeye. As of today August 12, 2015 the Sockeye fisheries is still open till further notice.

Please check back regularly for updates.

For further inquiry contact Andrew Meshue NSTC Fisheries Manager or Ann Guichon NSTC Fisheries Coordinator @ 250.392.7361

Andrew Meshue
Northern Shuswap Tribal Council
17 S. 1st Avenue
Williams Lake, BC V2G 1H4


FISHERIES NOTICE!

Fishing for Chinook salmon is open July 8, 2015 at 6:00 PM under license XFSC 118 2015.

The retention of SOCKEYE SALMON (Oncorhynchus nerka) is prohibited in the waters of the Fraser River until August 7 2015 at 6:00 PM. SOCKEYE SALMON (Oncorhynchus nerka) may be retained in the waters of the Chilcotin River and the Chilko River during this time period.

This license is valid from July 8, 2015 to August 7, 2015.  You will be notified ASAP via catch monitors on site or the NSTC website & facebook page that a closure is in effect due to conservation concerns or extreme environmental conditions.

Non-Secwepemc can be designated to fish providing they have obtained one or all of the following:

  1. Letter from an NStQ Band indicating permission to harvest fish in the NStQ Traditional Territory, and/or
  2. Fishing Authorization from the Northern Shuswap Tribal Council Fisheries Department.
  3. Transportation Authorization. Identifies the number of fish being transported out of the territory. Commonly used by NStQ living in urban areas.
  4. The Fishing Authorization can also serve as a transportation permit for out of town fishers if the NSTC is closed and the number of fish in possession of the traveler does not exceed the amount authorized to fish for.

Note that those non-Secwepemc fishers wishing to fish at Farwell must also obtain a permit from the NSTC Fisheries; however, priority will be given to the fishers from the local Secwepemc Communities.

Catch Surveying and Reporting

Fishers please report your catch to the NSTC Catch Monitoring staff that are present at the fishing sites.  Fishers also be aware that you can report your catch to the NSTC Fisheries Department if no Catch Monitoring Staff are available during their fishing times.

Catch survey information is considered strictly confidential; however summary data statistics will be used by the NSTC for fisheries management planning purposes.  It is extremely important to report and record all catches and fishing effort.

Traditional Fishing Practices

Traditional Fishing Practices shall be exercised with pride and respect for the resources that we rely on. Please respect and practice our traditional methods of fishing in a safe and healthy manner and demonstrate our respect for traditional activities to our children; in addition it is important to convey that respect to the public and exemplify pride in ourselves when we are on the land.

Fishing Conduct

Fishers will remove all garbage from fishing sites; this illustrates respect for our traditional territories.  Fish entrails will be removed, buried or thrown into the river and all harvested fish must be removed from the fishing site.  Permission will be sought for use of private property.  Please refrain from using drugs or alcohol while at the fishing sites.

Use of fish caught under this plan

Fish caught under this plan will be used for food, social and ceremonial purposes only.  Trading fish with other First Nations for traditional items (foods, tools etc…) is encouraged.

Please check back regularly for updates.

For further inquiry contact Andrew Meshue NSTC Fisheries Manager or Ann Guichon NSTC Fisheries Coordinator @ 250.392.7361

Andrew Meshue

Northern Shuswap Tribal Council

17 S. 1st Avenue

Williams Lake, BC    V2G 1H4

 


The Northern Shuswap Tribal Council would like to thank Canadian Heritage for their generous donation to our National Aboriginal Day Celebrations through Celebrate Canada program funding.

Le Nord du Conseil Tribal Shuswap voudrait remercier le Canada en fête Programme de financement pour leur soutien financier à fournir un financement pour nos festivités de la Journée nationale des Autochtones.


 

WLIB Highway Project Announcement


BCTCSpring

BCTC Spring 2015 Newsletter


 

Pink Shirt Day 2015 – NSTC Staff wearing their pink shirts!  Click on the picture for a larger view.

NSTC staff - Pink Shirt Day

Other Pink Shirt Day Pictures 2015

KevinNuefeld

2015-02-25 14.30.17


News Release

First Nations establish clear mining policy and rules for resource companies
WILLIAMS LAKE, BC. Dec.1, 2014: The Northern Secwepemc te Qelmucw Leadership Council (comprised of the Xat’sull, T’exelc, Tsq’escen’ and Stswecem’c/Xgat’tem First Nations, near the city of Williams Lake, BC) announced today its four First Nations have jointly adopted a comprehensive and detailed mining policy that will be applied to all existing, proposed and future projects that involve or impact on its lands, waters and rights.
The policy, and a companion tool kit to manage its implementation and enforcement, was developed by the Fair Mining Collaborative and covers everything from efforts to stake claims, through every stage of the mining process, to agreement compliance and benefits from operating mines, to mine clean-up. It is a clear statement of leadership and authority by the Northern Secwepemc within their stewardship and title lands.
“Since mining arrived in BC First Nations have been ignored and imposed upon, and more recently, as the courts have reaffirmed our rights, some have argued that they do not know what First Nations want and there are no rules to play by,” said Chief Bev Sellars of the Xat’sull (Soda Creek), First Nation, which first commissioned the project in 2013.
“With this Mining Policy we can no longer be ignored or imposed upon, and the Province and industry can no longer claim they do not know how to work with us – this document spells that out in clear, specific terms,’’ said Chief Sellars. Chief Ann Louie of the T’exelc (Williams Lake Indian Band), said: “The Mount Polley tailings pond disaster that has affected our communities has reinforced our decision to proceed with this very carefully developed policy, but the impetus for it was the cumulative effect of more than 150 years of bad mining practices and devastating impacts on First Nations in BC.”
“For years we warned that the Mount Polley dam was a disaster waiting to happen and we were ignored. This NStQ Mining Policy is designed to make sure that this does not happen again, and provide us with the tools to monitor and ensure compliance with safety and all other regulation and conditions imposed on any mines that are allowed,” said Chief Louie. Tsq’escen’ (Canim Lake) Chief Mike Archie said: “This is not a draft document; it is a carefully researched and clearly written policy which states what will be required for any mine work at any level to proceed. And we have developed the tools to ensure our people have the knowledge of First Nations Title and Rights, and mining laws and regulations, to enforce it and ensure compliance with any agreements.
“BC’s mining laws need reforming – from free-entry claims staking, to the environmental review process, to the monitoring and enforcement of mine regulations and clean-up commitments – but while British Columbians are being forced to wait for government and industry to wake up to this reality, we intend to ensure that we reform what happens on our lands.”

Stswecem’c/Xgat’tem (Canoe & Dog Creek First Nation) Chief Patrick Harry said: “This is not about ending all mining. It is about ending the practice of anyone being allowed to stake a claim anywhere they want, exploring wherever they want and developing projects regardless of our rights, concerns and objections.

“It is about making sure the right projects are accepted and done the right way, and that their operation, maintenance and adherence to conditions are monitored. We invite government and industry to work with us on this, not fight against us, as we are offering a way forward that ends confrontation and stagnation.”

Amy Crook, Executive Director of the Fair Mining Collaborative said the NStQ Mining Policy was thoroughly researched, took the best of BC government regulations and the best practices of other jurisdictions in Canada and other countries, and built on excellent work already done by the BC First Nations Mining and Energy Council regarding policies and benefit agreements.

“This policy gives First Nations a practical plan and the tools to back it up. It gives them the recourses to deal with governments and companies as equals from a position of knowledge and strength,’’ said Ms. Crook.

Dave Porter, CEO of the BC First Nations Energy and Mining Council, welcomed the NStQ Mining Policy, and said he believes industry and all British Columbians stand to benefit from it through more stability and clarity for investment, and improved monitoring and enforcement of mining regulations, conditions and impact on the environment.

“Everyone wants more certainty and to avoid confrontation, bad projects, environmental disasters, and fortunes wasted on stalled and rejected projects,” said Mr. Porter. “I believe First Nations mining policies are essential to achieve this by focusing on sustainable projects whose social and environmental risks do not outweigh the targeted profit benefits for their proponents, and which create genuine shared benefits for all parties.”

Xat’sull First Nation Chief Sellars summed up the policy by saying: “Since colonization it has been the government’s and industry’s way or the highway. That has to change. We are taking the lead in promoting safer and more accountable industry practices in Northern Secwepemc Territory.”

Xat’sull First Nation: NStQ Mining Co-ordinator Jacinda Mack: Cell: (250) 302.1739

Williams Lake Indian Band: Economic Dev. Officer Kirk Dressier: Office: (250) 296 3507 Ext. 116

Link to NStQ Mining Policy: http://northernshuswaptribalcouncil.com/?page_id=765

Link to NStQ Tool Kit: http://northernshuswaptribalcouncil.com/?page_id=765